Monday, March 18, 2019

The Progressive Movement Essay -- Progressives American Political Poli

The modernized Movement (ca. 1890s-1910s) Even more than high-energy a sphere of historical contr all oversy than that over the Populists is the historians inclination over the Progressive causa. The Progressives were a heterogeneous collection of reformers. Active in the first place in the nations cities and the urban mass media (and in the legislatures of such states as Wisconsin and rising York), the Progressives carried divulge efforts to reform the Statesn society and governance on all(a) fronts. They numbered among their ranks well-disposed Progressives (such as Jane Addams, the founder of the Hull House settlement movement), frugalal Progressives (such as Richard Ely, the noted Wisconsin economist who emphasise the need to prevent swell concentrations of economical power), legal Progressives (such as Louis D. Brandeis, the noted Massachusetts attorney and U.S. sovereign courtyard Justice, and his protege, Harvard Law School professor Felix dog-ironfurter), cul tural Progressives (including novelists such as Frank Norris and Upton Sinclair and such muckraking journalists as Ida M. Tarbel l), and of course the great Progressive politicians, themselves fashioning up a remarkable spectrum of Progressive variations.Occupying the poles of the Progressive semipolitical spectrum were Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, apiece of whom developed his own brand of political Progressive surmise and policy.Roosevelts impudent Nationalism punctuate giving a vigorous home(a) governing body the power to regulate and mediate among large, clashing economic and friendly actors. stainless bigness was no sin if these powerful institutions and organizations could be brought into a stable, cooperatige kind relationship with one another through the medium of government.Wilsons New immunity emphasized using government power to knock the large economic and neighborly forces down to size and keeping government, business, labor, and society at a huma n scale. Rather than concentrating on using the federal government to drub field problems, Wilsonian Progressives believed in using state and local governments as laboratories of reform. Recognizing the transition of the American nation, they argued for the need to tailor government responses to problems to the specific political, social, and economic contexts in which they would have to operate.What held these heterogeneous and quarrelsome Progressives together as a movement was the... ... become moral, sober, and industrious by adopting and enforcing the Prohibition Amendment and legislation (the infamous Volstead Act) put it into effect.The historians debate on Progressivism divides between backward-looking and forward-looking interpreters. Richard Hofstadter, the founder and facilitate the booster cable exponent of the backward-looking school, saw Progressives as middle-class Americans, small businessmen and market keeper and professionals, who yearned to restore the re gard America of their youth. Of course, Hofstadter noted in passing, this idealized America never existed, confronting the Progressives with a paradox rich in irony and poignancy. In trying to revive something that was, at best, an inspiring myth, they actually helped to modify the record of American society, economy, and politics. By contrast, the forward-looking school, whose first great counselor-at-law was Robert H. Wiebe, maintained that the Progressives confronted head-on the challenges of the emerging modern American economy and society. Wiebes Progressives emphasized efficiency, predictability, and grounds in propounding their public policy and their critiques of societys ills. The Progressive Movement strive -- Progressives American Political PoliThe Progressive Movement (ca. 1890s-1910s) Even more energetic a sphere of historical controversy than that over the Populists is the historians argument over the Progressive movement. The Progressives were a h eterogeneous collection of reformers. Active chiefly in the nations cities and the urban mass media (and in the legislatures of such states as Wisconsin and New York), the Progressives carried out efforts to reform American society and governance on all fronts. They numbered among their ranks social Progressives (such as Jane Addams, the founder of the Hull House settlement movement), economic Progressives (such as Richard Ely, the noted Wisconsin economist who emphasized the need to prevent great concentrations of economic power), legal Progressives (such as Louis D. Brandeis, the noted Massachusetts attorney and U.S. Supreme Court Justice, and his protege, Harvard Law School professor Felix Frankfurter), cultural Progressives (including novelists such as Frank Norris and Upton Sinclair and such muckraking journalists as Ida M. Tarbel l), and of course the great Progressive politicians, themselves making up a remarkable spectrum of Progressive variations.Occupying the poles of the Progressive political spectrum were Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, each of whom developed his own brand of political Progressive theory and policy.Roosevelts New Nationalism emphasized giving a vigorous national government the power to regulate and mediate among large, clashing economic and social actors. Mere bigness was no sin if these powerful institutions and organizations could be brought into a stable, cooperatige relationship with one another through the medium of government.Wilsons New Freedom emphasized using government power to knock the large economic and social forces down to size and keeping government, business, labor, and society at a human scale. Rather than concentrating on using the federal government to solve national problems, Wilsonian Progressives believed in using state and local governments as laboratories of reform. Recognizing the diversity of the American nation, they argued for the need to tailor government responses to problems to the specific po litical, social, and economic contexts in which they would have to operate.What held these heterogeneous and quarrelsome Progressives together as a movement was the... ... become moral, sober, and industrious by adopting and enforcing the Prohibition Amendment and legislation (the notorious Volstead Act) putting it into effect.The historians debate on Progressivism divides between backward-looking and forward-looking interpreters. Richard Hofstadter, the founder and still the leading exponent of the backward-looking school, saw Progressives as middle-class Americans, small businessmen and tradesman and professionals, who yearned to restore the idealized America of their youth. Of course, Hofstadter noted in passing, this idealized America never existed, confronting the Progressives with a paradox rich in irony and poignancy. In trying to revive something that was, at best, an inspiring myth, they actually helped to transform the nature of American society, economy, and politics. By contrast, the forward-looking school, whose first great advocate was Robert H. Wiebe, maintained that the Progressives confronted head-on the challenges of the emerging modern American economy and society. Wiebes Progressives emphasized efficiency, predictability, and rationality in propounding their public policy and their critiques of societys ills.

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